Justice

Caitlyn Jenner Just Took a Big Stand Against Bullying

July 14th 2015

By:
Laura Donovan

Caitlyn Jenner, who recently graced the cover of Vanity Fair's July 2015 issue, is now taking a stand against bullying through the the #Day1 campaign, a project within The Tyler Clementi Foundation:

Thank you Caitlyn Jenner for supporting our work to end bullying through the #Day1 campaign. You are creating a better...

Posted by Tyler Clementi Foundation on Monday, July 13, 2015

 

"Thank you Caitlyn Jenner for supporting our work to end bullying through the #Day1 campaign," reads the Tyler Clementi Foundation Facebook page. "You are creating a better world for our youth and we are thrilled to have your support. Sending our love back to you."

At 65, Jenner first spoke publicly about transitioning to female earlier this year in a highly publicized interview with ABC News' Diane Sawyer. During the sit-down, Jenner confessed to feeling suicidal before transitioning into a woman, adding that letting others down was a major stress for a long time.

"As of now I have all the male parts and all that kind of stuff, so in a lot of ways we're different, but we still identify as female," Jenner said at the time. "And that's very hard for Bruce Jenner today. Why? I don't want to disappoint people."

When Jenner fully transitioned, she broke President Barack Obama's Twitter record of acquiring one million followers in five hours and said she was thrilled to finally live the way she wanted:

The #Day1 movement aims to fight against bullying in schools and work environments by defining anti-harassment standards on day one:

ATTN: previously reported on a study revealing that childhood bullying can negatively impact victims well into adulthood.

Dr. Dieter Wolke, one of the paper authors, told ATTN: at the time that these findings and the previous extensive research he's done on bullying show that childhood harassment can potentially hinder someone's confidence and opportunities for life as a result of the damaging effects of bullying.

"It really does knock your self-esteem and how you approach people," Dr. Wolke told ATTN:. "If you get bullied for a long time, you don't trust other people. We also found in a different study that you're less likely to [be able to] work in teams, to find a partner, to trust others, [and more likely to] leave a job sooner because you don't like the conflict."

Related: Caitlyn Jenner Is 'Blown Away' by John Oliver's Transgender Rights Comments