Justice

Jennifer Aniston Slams Tabloids That Target Her Over Not Having Children

Jennifer Aniston shockingly does not have her own official Facebook page, Twitter, or Instagram account. That means that when the actress decided she was "fed up" of people asking if she was pregnant, she used a more traditional means of expression: an op-ed.

Aniston wrote a piece for The Huffington Post, titled "For The Record," where she clarified this: "For the record, I am not pregnant. What I am is fed up." And you can't blame her. It seems like almost every single week, Aniston is asked if she is pregnant, or simply declared "Pregnant!" by a tabloid.

"[...] the stalking and objectification I’ve experienced first-hand, going on decades now, reflects the warped way we calculate a woman’s worth."

"I used to tell myself that tabloids were like comic books," she writes, "not to be taken seriously, just a soap opera for people to follow when they need a distraction."

"But I really can’t tell myself that anymore because the reality is the stalking and objectification I’ve experienced first-hand, going on decades now, reflects the warped way we calculate a woman’s worth."

And that calculation, Aniston has deduced, is based on whether or not a woman is married and has children.

"The sheer amount of resources being spent right now by press trying to simply uncover whether or not I am pregnant (for the bajillionth time... but who’s counting) points to the perpetuation of this notion that women are somehow incomplete, unsuccessful, or unhappy if they’re not married with children."

She points out that there is plenty of worthy news in the world to cover ("mass shootings, wildfires, major decisions by the Supreme Court, an upcoming election") over her is-she-or-isn't-she pregnancy status.

And Aniston wants to change the narrative.

"Here’s where I come out on this topic: we are complete with or without a mate, with or without a child. We get to decide for ourselves what is beautiful when it comes to our bodies. That decision is ours and ours alone. [...] We don’t need to be married or mothers to be complete. We get to determine our own 'happily ever after' for ourselves."

While she acknowledges that she "may become a mother some day," it's not something that she is "in pursuit of," and she doesn't need you to feel pity for her because of this decision.

Furthermore, she wants you to know that, like most women, she bloats after eating certain foods: "I resent being made to feel 'less than' because my body is changing and/or I had a burger for lunch and was photographed from a weird angle and therefore deemed one of two things: 'pregnant' or 'fat.'"

You can read the entire article at The Huffington Post.

Watch ATTN:'s video about the pressure women face to have children below.