Health

These Gorgeous Photos Show What Childhood Is Like Without Technology

A New Zealand mother of four has created a captivating photo series of her children's lives growing up without many modern technologies. With more young people using technology in school and to entertain themselves, these photos depict a unique childhood that many of today's kids don't experience themselves.

Niki Boon photography

Niki Boon, whose photo series is titled "Childhood in the Raw," captures the adventures and misadventures of her unschooled children playing on their 10-acre property in New Zealand. Ages six through 12, the four kids can be seen playing in the mud, swimming in bodies of water, interacting with animals, and roaming the outdoors shirtless.

Boon wrote on her Facebook page that her children are "totally aware" of modern devices and have engaged with kids who do use technology.

In fact, one image shows her son playing with a broken TV:

Niki Boon photography

Niki Boon photography

Though many of the photos show the kids having fun, the series also shows them when they're frowning or crying while playing outside:

Niki Boon photography

Niki Boon photography

"We haven't had TV since the eldest was an infant," Boon told ABC News. "So they don't know what life is like with a TV and likewise with electronic devices."

While the family does own a computer and other daily appliances, Boon told ABC News that she asks her children to seek out information through books and hands-on learning.

Niki Boon photography

"If we need to find information out, we use books and other tangible resources, and a lot of their learning is done hands-on in their environment," she told ABC News. "Electronics are in their lives by default, living in the world we have these days, but we encourage our children to turn their natural curiosities to the riches of tangibles like books, the outdoors, nature and our immediate environment as a whole."

Niki Boon photography

Many people love Boon's approach to parenting:

Niki Boon photography

"I believe my children are right where they belong," Boon told Metro U.K. "[C]overed in mud, running and living through nature. They belong here wild and free and earth-connected in a way where the landscape begins and their little souls end."

Check out Boon's website to see more images in her photo series.