Health

Tampax Pocket Pearl Tampons Have Just One Problem — and It's a Big One

When it comes to aesthetics, Tampax's newest product, Pocket Pearl, is definitely colorful and creative — the small tampons look like candy in wrappers designed by Marc Jacobs.

colorfully wrapped tampax pocket pearl tampons

But when it comes to being an actual functioning tampon, consumers say that's where it fails. And that's not really a place where you want to tampons to fail.

So what's the problem, exactly? According to dissatisfied tampon users, the biggest problem is that the applicator doesn't fully extend, making it difficult to insert the tampon, rendering the applicator basically useless. And they weren't shy about sharing their frustrations with Tampax on the company's Facebook page:

Words frequently used in these posts to describe the tampons were "awful" and "horrible," with Tampax responding to almost every complaint with an apology and phone number for customer service. With those "please call" responses, it's as though Tampax became the Jeb Bush of tampons.

And about those designs — not everyone is psyched on them. "What a great idea: make the wrapper bright colors," snarks one Facebook user. "I mean really? We don't need fantasy wrappers, it's not like this is a fun time of the month for any of us. Just stupid!"

If you're thinking, 'Come on, how much confusion can one tampon cause?' The answer is, so much that Tampax had to make a video showing exactly how to use their Pocket Pearl tampon.

Because of this tricky applicator, the line of tampons has an average two star review on Amazon.

To quote Facebook commenters: If women are going to be taxed for tampons, then shouldn't those tampons at least not be "horrible"? A fancy wrapper can't make up for a poorly designed applicator. And not only is the wrapper made to be "super cute" (according to this Tampax Facebook post), but it's also engineered to be a less noisy wrapper, which some women don't see as a plus:

One Facebook user put it simply, "I don't like your products any longer."