Justice

These Feminist Illustrations Are Popping up Everywhere

Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti has received a lot of attention for her illustrations, which have strong feminist messages. In April 2014, Rossetti embarked on a drawing endeavor with the intention of creating "something worthy," and her illustrations have broached many important subjects such as body image issues, sexuality, sexism, and sexual assault, among others.

Carol Rossetti drawings

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Rossetti's drawings, which are often translated into multiple languages, typically include a graphic of a woman alongside poignant words that describe her particular situation.

Rossetti told ATTN: via email that these drawings are all part of her Women project, which was mostly inspired by common people, and that some stories are based on people she knows while others stem from fan suggestions.

"For each case, I would try my best to research and be respectful to their stories," Rossetti told ATTN:. "I also know that we have a big problem of representation, and I wanted to bring a large variety of characters to tell these stories. So I always try to bring different skin tones, dressing styles, body types, etc."

Examples of her work, and the many topics she tackles.

One drawing in the collection challenges the notion that successful women are fiercely competitive with each other and cannot sustain a sincere friendship as such.

Carol Rossetti drawings

"Erica and Lillian are tired of hearing that women are 'way too competitive' and real friendship is something that only exists among men," the drawing reads. "They have been friends for a long time and don't know where this absurd idea came from. Women are great friends, and the sorority feeling shouldn't be underestimated."

In another drawing, Rossetti highlights the unfair breastfeeding shaming that many mothers face.

RELATED: 2015 Was the Year of the Breast

Carol Rossetti art

"Katia has been criticized for breastfeeding in public," the drawing reads. "Katia, you don’t have to remain home during the whole breastfeeding period of your kid, and there’s nothing obscene about doing that in public. The female body shouldn’t be constantly sexualized."

In addition to confronting breastfeeding shaming, she broaches light-hearted issues such as the pressure on females to shave their legs.

She also covers darker topics like marital rape, which has only been illegal in the U.S. for about 23 years. (ATTN: previously noted that some states have exemptions for certain offenses, making it more difficult to prove all instances of spousal rape.) Certain people also subscribe to the argument that one cannot be raped in a marriage, but Rossetti's artwork explains that forced sex from anyone is clearly unacceptable (and rape).

RELATED: Where Some People Can Get Away With Rape in the U.S.

"When Sunetra's husband forced her into sex, some people told her there was nothing wrong about it and it was her duty as a wife to serve him well," the drawing reads. "Sunetra, your husband doesn't own you and marriage doesn't grant him the right to violate your dignity. Forced sex is rape, and it's always wrong!"

Rossetti told ATTN: that this particular drawing resonated with many of her followers.

"People really shared that and got involved with it," she said. "It is a serious problem all over the world, and I guess people are only starting to actually talk about it."

Feminist poster

The reception to Rossetti's project.

Over the past two years, she has received immense positive feedback for this project and even some guidance from fans on social media. She has garnered 300,000 Facebook fans, and she gained a robust international following of women.

"There were time[s] I got good suggestions, sometimes people would advise me into changing something to make the message clearer, sometimes they would correct my typos," Rossetti told ATTN:. "I think it was precisely this easy communication with my public [following] that allowed to project to grow so much. It got more mature because of this interaction. Since 2014, many more people started following my work in different social media [platforms]."

Go to Carol Rossetti's website for more information on her work.

Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti has received a lot of attention for her illustrations, which have strong feminist messages. In April 2014, Rossetti embarked on a drawing endeavor with the intention of creating "something worthy," and her illustrations have broached many important subjects such as body image issues, sexuality, sexism, and sexual assault, among others.

Carol Rossetti drawings

RELATED: The Rise In Multiracial Babies Says a Lot About America

Rossetti's drawings, which are often translated into multiple languages, typically include a graphic of a woman alongside poignant words that describe her particular situation. Rossetti told ATTN: via email that these drawings are all part of her Women project, which was mostly inspired in common people, and that some stories are based on people she knows while others stem from fan suggestions.

"For each case, I would try my best to research and be respectful to their stories," Rossetti told ATTN:. "I also know that we have a big problem of representation, and I wanted to bring a large variety of characters to tell these stories. So I always try to bring different skin tones, dressing styles, body types etc."

One drawing in the collection challenges the notion that successful women are fiercely competitive with each other and cannot sustain a sincere friendship as such.

Carol Rossetti drawings

"Erica and Lillian are tired of hearing that women are 'way too competitive' and real friendship is something that only exists among men," the drawing reads. "They have been friends for a long time and don't know where this absurd idea came from. Women are great friends, and the sorority feeling shouldn't be underestimated."

In another drawing, Rossetti highlights the unfair breastfeeding shaming that many mothers face.

RELATED: 2015 Was the Year of the Breast

Carol Rossetti art

"Katia has been criticized for breastfeeding in public," the drawing reads. "Katia, you don’t have to remain home during the whole breastfeeding period of your kid, and there’s nothing obscene about doing that in public. The female body shouldn’t be constantly sexualized."

In addition to confronting breastfeeding shaming, she broaches light-hearted issues such as the pressure on females to shave their legs. She also covers darker topics like marital rape, which has only been illegal in the U.S. for about 23 years. ATTN: previously noted that some states have exemptions for certain offenses, making it more difficult to prove all instances of spousal rape. Certain people also subscribe to the argument that one cannot be raped in a marriage, but Rossetti's artwork explains that forced sex from anyone is not OK.

RELATED: Where Some People Can Get Away With Rape in the U.S.

"When Sunetra's husband forced her into sex, some people told her there was nothing wrong about it and it was her duty as a wife to serve him well," the drawing reads. "Sunetra, your husband doesn't own you and marriage doesn't grant him the right to violate your dignity. Forced sex is rape, and it's always wrong!"

Rossetti told ATTN: that this particular drawing moved many of her followers.

"People really shared that and got involved with it," she said. "It is a serious problem all over the world, and I guess people are only starting to actually talk about it."

The reception to Rossetti's project.

Over the past two years, she has received immense positive feedback for this project and even some guidance from fans on social media. She has garnered 300,000 Facebook fans and a robust international following of women.

"There were time[s] I got good suggestions, sometimes people would advise me into changing something to make the message clearer, sometimes they would correct my typos," Rossetti told ATTN:. "I think it was precisely this easy communication with my public [following] that allowed to project to grow so much. It got more mature because of this interaction."

Go to Carol Rossetti's website for more information on her work.