Justice

ISIS Claims Responsibility for Paris Attacks

November 14th 2015

By:
Alex Mierjeski

Early reports indicate that the self-proclaimed Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, has claimed responsibility for the deadly attacks that erupted across Paris Friday night, leaving 127 dead.

The terrorist group didn't immediately connect themselves to the attacks, though the details of the tragedy lead commentators and analysts to suspect the extremists known for encouraging smaller, indiscriminate attacks around the globe. Some shooters reportedly indicated that the attacks were retaliation for French involvement in military action in Syria.

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French president François Hollande said the attacks were planned abroad by Islamic State militants with internal help in France, Reuters reports.

"Faced with war, the country must take appropriate action," he said following an emergency meeting with the country's security chiefs. He has also called for three days of national mourning.

Early indications from social media accounts also drew links between the attacks and the terrorist group. According to Rita Katz, director of SITE, an intelligence group that monitors terrorist activity, ISIS-related social media channels acted as if the attacks were related to the group before any confimation.

The group has also been involved in recent attacks in multiple countries.

Related: How Parisians Are Reacting To Friday's Attacks

As violence exploded throughout Paris Friday night, apparent supporters of the self-proclaimed Islamic State took to Twitter using an Arabic hashtag translating roughly into "Paris is burning." Others using the same hashtag decried the attacks and those who used it for praise—probably outnumbering users voicing support.

U.S. officials Friday were "relatively certain" that a recent air strike targeting "Jihadi John," the ISIS member filmed beheading hostages in numerous gruesome videos, was a success, CNN reported.

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