Here's Jon Stewart's Final Piece Of Advice For "Daily Show" Viewers

After 16 years hosting "The Daily Show," Jon Stewart had his final episode, which ran for 50 minutes on Thursday night.

"Bullshit is everywhere," a teary-eyed Stewart said during the final moments of his last segment. "There is very little that you will encounter in life that hasn't in some ways been infused with bullshit...So I say to you tonight that the best defense against bullshit is vigilance. So if you smell something, say something."

The episode had many cameo appearances from guests such as Rob Corddry, Matt Walsh, Ed Helms, Martin Scorsese, Olivia Munn, John Oliver, Rob Riggle, and incoming "Daily Show" host Trevor Noah. Hillary Clinton, Rahm Emanuel, John Kerry, Wolf Blitzer, Bill O'Reilly, John McCain, and Lindsey Graham left closing messages for Stewart as well.

This incredible farewell to Jon Stewart concludes an era for o...

This incredible farewell to Jon Stewart concludes an era for our generation. #JonVoyage

Posted by ATTN: on Thursday, August 6, 2015


Stewart took a moment to thank everyone for being part of his 16-year adventure on "The Daily Show."

"The thing I'm going to miss most about this place is the people," he said during the final episode before taking the time to show a montage of the whole team behind the show. "The people here never fail to have my back in those moments ... It's the thing I'm most proud of about this place. It's not the show, it's the people, the process of the show ... I've been in show business for a long time ... and this is the most beautiful place I've ever been, and I'll never have that again ... They're the best in the business."

Bruce Springsteen showed up to perform a closing set.

"I feel somewhat of a responsibility, an obligation, to devote the entirety of our last show to post-debate coverage," Stewart said before inviting a bunch of former "Daily Show" correspondents to come forward and joke about the debate, including Kristin Schaal, Steve Carell, and Samantha Bee.

"When you look at the talent who has passed through these doors, it would be hard to screw this show up," Stewart said.

"Tonight I heart Huckabee," Carell said.

Who else showed up?

Fellow Comedy Central host Larry Wilmore also popped up and mentioned that his own program, "The Nightly Show," got bumped thanks to the extended final "Daily Show" segment with Stewart.

"Black shows matter, Jon," Wilmore said.

Wyatt Cenac, a former "Daily Show" correspondent who recently generated headlines for going public about an argument he had with Stewart over a racial joke, appeared as well, and the two made amends on camera.

"My social media is blowing up," Cenac said.

"I hear you," Stewart replied.

As expected, Stewart's well-known partner-in-crime and former colleague Stephen Colbert bid him farewell.

"You're Frodo," Colbert said. "Jon, one of us is adult size and doesn't have hairy toes. Like Frodo, you are leaving us on a voyage of undying lands."

Just as it appeared Colbert was set to leave, the former Colbert Report host went off-script to deliver a message to Stewart on behalf of the rest of the Daily Show staff, past and present.

"We owe you because we learned from you. We learned from you by example, how to work with clarity, treat people with respect. You're infuriatingly good at your job," Colbert said. "[We are all] better at our jobs because we got to see you do yours."

Stewart's program was well-loved among the Millennial generation, and as ATTN: editor Sarah Gray pointed out on Thursday, today's young people will gush to their grandchildren about his legacy someday.

In the weeks leading up to Stewart's final episode, The Daily Show had big name guests such as President Barack Obama, comedian Louis C.K., and "Trainwreck" star Amy Schumer. He was widely praised for his unique brand of media and political commentary, often mocking cable news outlets and politicians in a way that resonated with the masses. His send-off inspired dozens of sentimental articles and fans started lining up at 7 a.m. Thursday morning to be present for the taping.