Environment

A Woman's Post About Getting Shot at Standing Rock

November 3rd 2016

By:
Laura Donovan

One woman's Facebook post about allegedly getting shot by a rubber bullet at Standing Rock highlights just how dire the situation has become for protestors of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

Journalist and activist Erin Schrode wrote in a post on Wednesday that police fired rubber bullets at Standing Rock protesters who have gathered to condemn the DAPL. Her post follows multiple reports that police have used rubber bullets and pepper spray against protesters at Standing Rock.

Schrode expressed disappointment over the police treatment of protesters in her post:

Erin Schrode Facebook

"My body will be okay, but I am hurting, I am incensed, I am weeping, I am scared," she wrote. "Peaceful, prayerful, unarmed, nonviolent people on one side of a river; militarized police with armed vehicles and assault weapons occupying treaty land on the other, where sacred burial grounds have already been destroyed. What is happening here in North Dakota is like nothing I have ever seen in my life, anywhere in the world."

She also criticized President Barack Obama's recent comments to NowThisNews that he is going to wait for the situation to "play out" in the coming weeks:

"It is inexcusable for the President Obama to say he will 'let it play out for several more weeks.' It is unjustifiable for the Attorney General to not be here. It is unconscionable for mainstream media to not cover this."

The proposed 1,100 plus mile-long pipeline would extend from North Dakota to Illinois and carry around 470,000 barrels of crude oil each day. Energy Transfer Partners, an energy company in Texas, has argued that the pipeline would create up to 12,000 construction jobs and boost the economy, The New York Times reported. Opponents of the DAPL say it could create environmental problems and contaminate the water supply of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. 

"I had heard stories of the brutal arrests at Standing Rock from the prior week – accounts of Natives being ripped out of sweat lodges, having their limbed ziptied, facing beatings with batons – but I never imagined being the target of violence myself," Schrode told ATTN: via email. "I knew that the police presence had escalated, but never once thought I would have any violent or forceful exchange. Water Protectors are peaceful, prayerful souls – not violent, not aggressive, not provocative. These people are risking their lives in an effort to protect their water, their sacred lands, the watershed and earth for all of us. Non violent direct action is a powerful technique, and one that absolutely need not be met with indiscriminate pepper spray and mace. As for the targeting of an innocent journalist onshore? Also inexcusable." 

Read her full post and watch her video below:

Warning: the video below is extremely graphic:

Update November 7, 2016 8:30 a.m. PT: this article has been updated to include a comment and video from Schrode.