Environment

One of the Concerns About Olympic Safety Might Have Been Proven True

After much talk about the poor quality of water plaguing Brazil, the Belgian Olympic team is alleging that one of their athletes became sick after competing in Rio de Janeiro's highly contaminated Guanabara Bay.

According to the Telegraph, Belgian sailor Evi Van Acker "reported feeling sick after Wednesday races," and later had to be seen by medical officials.

Although it is hard to say with certainty that Van Acker's sickness is a direct result of the contamination in the Bay's water, she did catch a gastrointestinal infection just weeks before the Olympics, something her coach believes she caught while training in Rio de Janeiro, the Daily Mail reported.

In a statement, the Belgian Olympic Committee said that Van Acker "has not fully recovered" from that previous infection and that "it makes it difficult for her to go through long periods of sustained effort," the Telegraph reported. As a result, Van Acker has suffered a string of unsatisfactory performances and is currently out of a position to win a medal.

Medical officials pointed out that Van Acker's illness seems to be an "isolated case" and that "no other sailor has reported feeling ill" thus far during the competition.

As ATTN: previously reported, the Bay is stricken with serious pollution problems, which includes rotaviruses to a possible 'superbacteria,"" all of which have concerned health officials and athletes alike.

But the Games in Rio have faced even more concerns besides the Bay's water.

Recently, Rio has had to beef up its security after concerns of increased street violence, Reuters reported.

According to Reuters, on Tuesday a bus filled with members of the media were attacked with stones, which resulted in two minor injuries.

Also, a group of Australian athletes were robbed during a fire evacuation days before the Games at the Olympic Villages, according to CNN. In addition, a Swedish tourist was "kidnapped at gunpoint" and taken into one of the city's slums, but was rescued a short time later, according to the Washington Post.