Politics

President Donald Trump's Newest Ban Could Cost Travelers Big Money

The U.S. just banned electronic devices bigger than a cellphone for passengers traveling from major airports in the Middle East and North Africa, and it could cause some travelers to lose work days and money.

Airplanes are an easy place to get sick

CNN's Donie O'Sullivan talked to travelers via text message about flying without their electronics. Syed Hussain lives in San Francisco, California, and usually works on long flights to the United Arab Emirates for business, but this time, his ability to work was "impaired" by the electronics ban.

"I easily spend 10 hours working on the plane," he said. "I'm going to be seriously impaired in my ability to work without a laptop."

Citing terrorism concerns, the new rules implemented on Monday will block travelers from bringing tablets like iPads, laptops and large cameras into the cabin of the plane, forcing them to be checked with the luggage. The ban mostly impacts majority-Muslim countries. The U.K also announced an electronics ban for six countries, according to CNN.

Here are the 10 airports with restrictions on electronic devices:

  • Queen Alia in Jordan
  • Cairo International in Egypt
  • Ataturk International in Turkey
  • King Abudlaziz in Saudi Arabia
  • King Khalid in Saudi Arabia
  • Kuwait International in Kuwait
  • Mohammaed V in Morocco
  • Doha International in Qatar
  • Dubai International in the United Arab Emirates
  • Abu Dhabi International in the United Arab Emirates

β€œWe have no comment on potential security precautions, but will provide any update as appropriate,” David Lapan, spokesperson for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), told The Guardian in an emailed statement Monday.

A Turkish entrepreneur told CNN that if the electronics ban continues he will likely cancel a summer trip to the E3 Expo, an electronic entertainment showcase, in Los Angeles, California, because he would have to check expensive equipment needed for the convention. "We're not going to check-in 20K worth of electronics," he wrote to CNN. Other travelers said that it was difficult to occupy young children without electronic devices.

People on Twitter discussed the impact of the electronics ban on travelers with some saying it's necessary for national security.

Others expressed the electronics ban goes too far.

Beyond personal work productivity, if the electronics ban deters U.S. international trips, it could have an economic impact. In 2015, the U.S. spent $246 billion on travel spending, including international passenger flights, and work-related activities, and received $148 billion in "international travel imports," according to the U.S. Travel Association. International travel spending supported more than 1 million jobs in the United States.

However, if this ban continues, some of those travelers and their money could make other plans. One unnamed traveler wrote to CNN, "Will the U.S. government pay for the day of work I will lose when I fly? Don't think so!!!"

RELATED: Hawaii Becomes the First State to Sue Over President Trump's Revised Travel Ban

The U.S. just banned electronic devices bigger than a cellphone for passengers traveling from major airports in the Middle East and North Africa, and it could cause some travelers to lose work days and money.

Airplanes are an easy place to get sick

CNN's Donie O'Sullivan talked to travelers via text message about flying without their electronics. Syed Hussain lives in San Francisco, California, and usually works on long flights to the United Arab Emirates for business, but this time, his ability to work was "impaired" by the electronics ban.

"I easily spend 10 hours working on the plane," he said. "I'm going to be seriously impaired in my ability to work without a laptop."

Citing terrorism concerns, the new rules implemented on Monday will block travelers from bringing tablets like iPads, laptops and large cameras into the cabin of the plane, forcing them to be checked with the luggage. The ban mostly impacts majority-Muslim countries. The U.K also announced an electronics ban for six countries, according to CNN.

Here are the 10 airports with restrictions on electronic devices:

  • Queen Alia in Jordan
  • Cairo International in Egypt
  • Ataturk International in Turkey
  • King Abudlaziz in Saudi Arabia
  • King Khalid in Saudi Arabia
  • Kuwait International in Kuwait
  • Mohammaed V in Morocco
  • Doha International in Qatar
  • Dubai International in the United Arab Emirates
  • Abu Dhabi International in the United Arab Emirates

β€œWe have no comment on potential security precautions, but will provide any update as appropriate,” David Lapan, spokesperson for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), told The Guardian in an emailed statement Monday.

A Turkish entrepreneur told CNN that if the electronics ban continues he will likely cancel a summer trip to the E3 Expo, an electronic entertainment showcase, in Los Angeles, California, because he would have to check expensive equipment needed for the convention. "We're not going to check-in 20K worth of electronics," he wrote to CNN. Other travelers said that it was difficult to occupy young children without electronic devices.

People on Twitter discussed the impact of the electronics ban on travelers with some saying it's necessary for national security.

Others expressed the electronics ban goes too far.

Beyond personal work productivity, if the electronics ban deters U.S. international trips, it could have an economic impact. In 2015, the U.S. spent $246 billion on travel spending, including international passenger flights, and work-related activities, and received $148 billion in "international travel imports," according to the U.S. Travel Association. International travel spending supported more than 1 million jobs in the U.S.

However, if the electronics ban continues, some of those travelers and their money could make other plans. One unnamed traveler wrote to CNN, "Will the U.S. government pay for the day of work I will lose when I fly? Don't think so!!!"

RELATED: Hawaii Becomes the First State to Sue Over President Trump's Revised Travel Ban

Featured Image:Flickr/Kim Seng